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Full text of "Pilgrim"

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I Waune W- SL 



aune n//. — )mpman 

Principal, 1927-1939 



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^Jhj true aentleman 



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kid bi 



virtue is nis business, studu his recreation, 
Service his contentment, ana usefulness 



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RALPH GHELLI 




PRANK DUNLAP 



r*w& 




WARREN KOURTZ 




WALTER ROBERTS 





MILTON FULLER JOSEPH LEANDRO 

~Jhe staff- is proud to dedicate this uear'i 
issue of Jill wictoru to its classmate 
now seruina in the ^Mrmed ~jro 
of out" country. 



tes 



forces 



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Editor-in-chief Isabel Brown 

Literary Editor Joan Eldfudge 

Business Manager David Crawley 

Sales Promotion Ralph Fortini 

I Harry Hanson 

Assistant Business Managers . . . -{ Richard Balboni 

! Robert Silva 

Art Editor Nancy Bartlett 

School News Barbara Carmichael 

. , . f Ernestine Mills 

Alumni ; . _, 

[ Anna Pederzani 

Girls' Sports Elide Benati 

Boys' Sports Harold Caramello 

f Ruth Dale 

i . . . . Dorothy O'Connell 
Senior Features <j RlCHARD Drew 

[_. . . William MacDonald 

f Lillian Shaw 

I Cynthia Holmes 

J Agnes Mazzanti 

Senior Poems "j Frances Schied 

J David Goldstein 

[. . . . David Maccaferri 
Candid Camera Robert VanAmburgh 

Typists I A"™ BouRNE 

L Priscilla Rowe 

J-^ubliskea bu ike 
tjmoutn ^Miak ^Dckool. 
/■^lumoutn, 



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AND HATH NOT CHARITY 

'O, come to me all ye who labor and are heavy-laden . 




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ITH D-day approaching and the con 
sciousness of your debt to the men 
in our country's service, to all men in 
Humanity's service, increasing, we must 
re-examine what we owe in order that we 
may know how we should repay. For 
our debt is such that no common coin can 
ever discharge it. The blood of our sons, 
the pain of our mothers, the sorrow of 
our friends, the suffering of children, 
poured out in floods to save our world, 
to make for us a better world, can be 
repaid only in kind, or in the hard, bright 
coin of Truth. This is no easy debt to be 
expunged by tendering the hollow counter- 
feit of lip service. This is no sham sacrifice to be acknowledged in 
the paper of hypocrisy. When a man dies for freedom, then we 
must live for freedom, must live that all men may be free. When a 
mother in the agony of fear seeks to guard her children and dies, 
we must take her orphans, all suffering mankind, and create for 
them a home. 

When the turmoil and the strife are stilled, we must be able 
to see through the mists of hurt and hate, God's sun of brotherly 
love. All men are brothers. Now in the awful compulsion of 
killing, fear blinds us to that. We must kill fear. It is against 
fear and prejudice and greed and injustice that we fight — and 
must continue fighting. Men are our enemies only when these 
passions blind them. When the last echoes of this present conflict 
are fading into oblivion to which we cannot too soon consign them, 
we must remember Lincoln's noble words: "With malice toward 
none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives 

us to see the right, let us strive on " 

Let us strive on. 

During the Battle of Britain, Winston Churchill said of the 
R. A. F. "Never have so many owed so much to so few!" And we 
now owe so much to so many! The debt is immeasurable. The 
blood and treasure given to us so unstintingly out of such boundless 
charity calls to us for an equal charity in our hearts. We must 
not fail. We dare not, else the slaughter comes again. 

Thomas Carlyle wrote about a century ago these words: 
"Nothing that was worthy in the past departs; no truth or goodness 
realized by man ever dies, or can die; but is all here, and, recognized 
or not, lives and works through endless changes." 

"What doth it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose 
his own soul?" ■*-- 

Edgar J. Mongan 

Page 5 



(J->LoarapkLca 





President 

WILLIAM MacDONALD 

Even if Billy had no other claim to 
fame, we would still remember him for his 
startlingly vivid ties .... gained experience 
for present position as Sophomore and Junior 
Vice President .... was also active on the 
S.A.S. and "Till Victory" staff .... played 
quarterback on the football team .... proud 
possessor of a black-and-red coupe which 
carries an amazing number of passengers .... admits a 
secret dread of submarines and the Weymouth football 
team .... spends some time in deep research in the Cordage 
lab, or is it in washing test tubes, Bill? .... aspires to 
become a Navy flyer .... partial to a Vought-Corsair. 



Vice-President 

RALPH FORTINI 

Although his carefree manner and mischievous eyes 
seem to belie the fact, our Vice President is a man of 
responsibilities. He has been President of the S.A.S., man- 
ager of the football team, sales manager of 
"Till Victory", and a 10c a week collector . . . 
can be found almost any afternoon laboring 
industriously at the Cordage Company .... 
says his pet peeve is our Class Secretary 
(Elide replies amicably that the feeling is 
mutual) .... will go into the Navy Air Corps 
soon after graduation . . . ambition? .... to 
win the wings of gold, of course. 




Page 6 



Secretary 

ELIDE BENATI 

Elide's pleasing personality and her 

ready smile for all have won her many 

friends. She has been an efficient Class 

Secretary for three years .... a member of 

the Library Staff, S.A.S., and Yearbook Staff 

.... showed skill and enthusiasm on girls' 

hockey and basketball teams .... lively 

cheerleader at many a football game .... an 

expert soda-jerker by virtue of experience in Gambini's . . . 

carries on correspondence regularly with two Army men 

(one is her brother) . . . hopes to be a gym teacher some day. 




Treasurer 

CHARLES TOURGEE 

Charlie appears to be a rather serious-minded person, 
but those who know him well find that he possesses a keen 
sense of humor .... served as class Treasurer in his 
Sophomore year also .... a "killer" on the trombone which 
he plays in the band and orchestra .... a member of the 
National Honor Society and the Senior 
Honor Group .... first baseman on the base- 
ball team .... is employed as clerk and 
stockboy in Smith's News Store .... dislikes 
people who "every time they open their 
mouth, put their foot into it" .... hopes to 
have his own Dixieland Band .... for the 
time being will be satisfied with the Navy, 
preferably V-12. 




Page 7 




f. 




^RftyER Of '99 

Th)e urcfory Cdgfe nouers ouerhead, 
find ye f hou soon he Yhscuoop fo serze Toe prrze 
De do nof ftnou-, ue orihy cawsumrsQ. 
CJe f(Qhf, and hope foQartyfron pari arid sfrrfe 
One mfmrfehy ghorrous hour rn fife, 
TfiedftmrryQ h?our of urcfory souQhfand ujon ' 
But ' Qofden nonenfs do nof hrnQer hono ; 
fhe 6rrd of ffrunph, haorntg Sucvq hrs SonQ, 
rVusf ' yrefd hrs perch unfo fhe dove, of peace. 



f)nd we nttsf/feep her fhere, unhhafhdsf 
fhe rorQhfy aod fhe mpofenf nay (jrvou 
foe joy of hafcyon hife onearfh hehocj 
Can uie, u>ho pause upon fhe fhreshofd here, 
tydd our pure, hurnQfhane fo fhafQreaf forch) 
(Jhrch 6rrghfhy hurns focheanse fhe uorfd of fears, 
f)nd hope lb do a YhrnQ fhafs nof 6 e en done 
Qy ahh fhe counfress fhousands fhrouQh fhe years / 
Cieuj iuorhds 6y neu deurces nusf 6e uon' 





rjs 



o re cor, 



d kere of thlnas tkeu ue done; 



<nlt4 seek to have some h 



ROBERT AGNONE 

His daily jaunt' on the 
Carver bus 

Must have made him de- 
cide 

On a faster method of 
travel : 

For now through the 
heavens he'll ride. 



ENIS ALMEIDA 

She's inclined to argu- 
ment, 
And manages so well 
She is quite oblivious 
To the ringing of the 
bell. 



AGNES ALSHEIMER 

She looks so very healthy 

One thing we can for- 
see: 

When she has an ache 
or pain, 

She'll get scant sympa- 
thy. 



FLORENCE ALVES 

"Five foot one or two," 

she says 
In a yearning, hopeful 

way. 
As though she still might 

grow an inch: 
At that she's right — she 

may. 




ENIS AMARAL 

Immaculate 

She'll always be: 

The best-dressed student 

Is certainly she. 



LUCY AMARAL 

Between this quatrain 
and the last 

There may be no rela- 
tion — 

But with needle and 
with thread 

Sister's a sensation. 



JULIA ANDREWS 

"Julia! Don't close that 

locker!" 
Comes the woeful cry of 

her mate, 
But Julia calmly turns 

around : 
It's always just too lat'e! 



BEVERLY ARMSTRONG 

Who crossed the Greek 

god statue's eyes 
And filled the desk 

drawers with snow? 
Who's the life of Art in 

Period V? 
We're sure you all must 

know. 



Page 9 



ROBERT ARNOLD 

If it happens to Agncne 
in Period VI, 

Next day it could happen 
to him; 

So he does a little detec- 
tive work 

To' keep life from getting 
too grim. 



EVA BAGNI 

In the gymnasium 
She's proved in her play 
That where there's a will 
There's surely a way. 



LOUISE BALBONI 

If she enters the service, 

'twill be as a nurse. 
That for care our boys 

may not lack : 
We bet that her second 

choice would be 
For the somewhat less 

glamorous W. A. C. 



NANCY BARTLETT 

She wields the pencil or 

the brush 
With such apparent ease 
We know before her work 

is done 
Results are sure to 

please. 



ELIDE BENATI 

Our Elide is versatile, 
Need we say any more? 
Well, she's Miss Person- 
ality 
Of the Class of '44. 



Page 10 




STANLEY BERNAGOZZI 

The girls may rant about 
six foot blondes 

The flaxen - haired dan- 
dies, and yet 

Even boys with flaming 
red hair can't compare 

With an honest-to-good- 
ness brunette ! 



ARLENE BORGATTI 

It's a matter of pride 
That she reach the door 

first; 
She'd take a head start 
If only she durst. 



GLORIA BORGHESANI 

Usually we won't predict, 

But in this case our 
guess is 

She will prove bewitch- 
ing with 

Starched cap on dark 
brown tresses. 



GINO BORSARI 

Plymouth High's own 
Harry James ! 

His music's so entranc- 
ing 

He just reaches for his 
trumpet 

And everyone starts 
dancing. 



ARLENE BOURNE 

"Five -feet -two, eyes of 

blue" — 
That's what she'd like to 

be; 
But disappointment she 

may face, 
Fct in inches she lacks 

three. 



BARBARA BOUTIN 

No barbed or bitter 
words have we 

For a girl like this; 

She never uses them her- 
self, 

Whatever goes amiss. 



BERNARD BRABANT 

His love of the scientific 
We would never mock: 
But is it quite the best 

approach 
To get a girl to talk? 



GRACE BRIGGS 

Her chosen field is nurs- 
ing: 

More hard work than ro- 
mance — 

Grace with quiet man- 
ner 

Will the uniform en- 
hance. 



ISABEL BROWN 

Providential 
It's been for us: 
She does so much 
With so little fuss. 



HAROLD CARAMELLO 

It was as captain of our 
teams 

He won his brightest 
fame; 

But Cary's socks of bril- 
liant hue 

Could well put it to 
shame. 




PRUDENCE CARBONE 

At times she is so seri- 
ous 

'Twould seem that' she 
were bearing 

All the troubles of these 
days 

That we all should be 
sharing. 



BARBARA CARMICHAEL 

She has infinite capacity 
For taking pains; 
Catch-as-catch-can 

methods 
She disdains. 



HELEN CARREIRA 

If you'd arouse his inter- 
est, girls, 

We suggest the means: 

A coiffure styled by 
Helen 

Will succeed beyond your 
dreams. 



CLYFTON CHANDLER 

Books have their place 
In the scheme of things, 
But over other pursuits 
They need not be kings. 



JOAN CHIARI 



the 



Strolling through 

corridors 
Or frolicking in the gym, 
Hot and dishevelled she 

never appears — 
But impeccably neat and 

trim. 



Page 11 



OLGA COCCHI 

When we have an inner 
urge 

To act as though aged 
ten. 

We observe her fine re- 
straint 

And grow right up again. 



SHIRLEY COX 

"Silently, like the Arab" 
She executes each task : 
Conscientious, capable — 
What more could anyone 
ask? 



DAVID CRAWLEY 

On the basketball floor 
Wove seen that he's 

good ; 
But with a profile like 

his 
He should hit Hollywood. 



RUTH DALE 

The army life is super, 
Marines are hard to beat : 
But in any competition 
It's always "Ben" the 
fleet. 



RUTH DALEY 

Gorham N. H.; and 

Ruthie 
Are close as Ike and 

Mike: 
A quiet town, a quiet 

girl- 
In this they are alike. 



Page 12 




DONALD DASSMAN 

Although the shortage 
is acute. 

He has a good supply: 

He snaps elastics glee- 
fully 

As he passes by. 



LEONORE DeCARLI 

As a serious student 
She's met success: 
Yet her warm smile 
Has triumphed no less. 



ANDREW DIETLIN 

A bite of a sandwich, a 
swallow of milk 

And then the rush be- 
gins: 

He supplements the 
change he gives 

With one of his cheerful 
grins. 



SHIRLEY DOUGLAS 

Quiet and unassuming. 
Friendly without guile. 
She demonstrates the 

value 
Of a fascinating smile. 



RICHARD DREW 

He sulks a bit in Latin. 
She wonders, "Does he 

smile?" 
M ; ss Wilber. you ought 

to see him 
When he's plucking his 

bass viol. 



VIRGINIA DREW 

We feel pushed and 
pulled at times 

Between school and part- 
time work : 

Whatever her commit- 
ments are, 

She is not one to shirk. 



JOAN ELDRIDGE 

She spends an hour each 

afternoon, 
"Experiment's I must 

do—" 
We shouldn't doubt that 

Physics 
Lures her to 102. 



FRANCES FERNANDES 

Polite and considerate 
We've found her to be — 
Harboring no 
Idiosyncracy. 



LEO FONTAINE 

We've found that Leo's 

reticence 
Belies his kingly name; 
In all associations 
He's proved to be quite 

tame. 



RALPH FORTINI 

He's quite the man of 

With Yearbook, S. A. S., 
Vice - presidency, basket- 
ball 
He achieves success. 




JOHN GILLI 

He is the best of com- 
pany! 

May he always have good 
luck 

As from our class he sal- 
lies forth 

As jolly as Friar Tuck. 



NORMA GILLI 

As typist or pianist 
The honest facts are 

these : 
In the office or at home 
She's mistress of the 

keys. 



ALTON GIOVANETTI 

His good spirits are con- 
tagious : 

He does whate'er he can 

To keep us happy at our 
tasks — 

He's our Good Humor 
man. 



MILTON GLASSMAN 

We're confident that he 
will find 

A painless way of drill- 
ing 

Or a cavity preventive — 

Then there'd be no need 
of a filling. 



JEANETTE GODDARD 

Orchestra, trio, 
Quartette and choir 
Could satisfy any 
Musician's desire. 



Page 13 



r - -, 



DAVID GOLDSTEIN 

If you're In an accident 
And no doctor is in 

sight, 
Just pray he's in the 

neighborhood : 
He can relieve your 

plight. 



VIRGINIA GRANDI 

Swing music to Ginny 
Is sheer inspiration : 
She commences to dance 
At the least provocation. 



NORMAN GUIDABONI 

Toll House cookies he'll 
prepare, 

A bulletin beard or car- 
toon — 

Lend a hand where'er he 
can 

From September until 
June. 



LOIS GUNTHER 

How does she get her 

work done? 
The answer we would 

find 
When every minute of 

the day 
The Army's on her mind. 



HELEN GUSTAVSON 

Her penchant for pranks 
Cannot be denied — 
She flatly refuses 
To be dignified. 



Page 14 




ROBERT HAIRE 
We've never seen you 

rushing. 
Nor entertained such 

thought: 
Pray, tell us, is there 

nothing 
In leaps and bounds 

you've sought? 



JANET HOLMAN 

"Haste makes waste! 
You may exclaim. 
But Janet hurries 
Just the same. 



BERNARD HOLMES 

Quiet as a churchmouse. 
Wary as a buck — 
Until he goes to study 

hall 
Where he really runs 

amuck. 



CYNTHIA HOLMES 

What but her voice 
Could we here mention? 
When Cynthia sings. 
We sit at attention. 



CORINNE JENNEY 

The piano is her true 
love. 

But we knew this be- 
fore — 

She's also an efficient 
clerk 

At Jennev's General 
Store. 



GEORGE JESSE 

It must be that he's 

fickle : 
We remember well the 

day 
When his only love was 

his violin — 
And now it's not that 

way. 



BARBARA JOHNSON 

Though her words be 
barbed. 

We must not take of- 
fense : 

The smile that goes with 
them 

Is just recompense. 



MADELEINE LaFOREST 

Parsimonious we cannot 
be 

When she'd a dime col- 
lect; 

For just beneath her 
gentle smile 

A firmness we detect. 



FRANK LAHEY 

He loves to tease the 

ladies: 
What can his motive be? 
Yet he declares his real 

desire 
Is to master history. | 



RICHARD LAPHAM 

He has admitted 
With some chagrin 
His October excursion 
Should never have been. 




RONALD LEARY 

Any day now we expect 

He'll charge down Lin- 
coln Street 

Shouting, "Heigh ho! 
Silver," 

And sweep her off her 
feet. 



GLORIA LONGHI 

Quiet, yet resourceful, 
Throughout the livelong 

day — 
Nothing causes worry : 
She says if doesn't pay. 



DAVID MACCAFERRI 

A flash of our own blue 

and white 
Across the floor and 

back — 
A daring run, a perfect 

shot, 
And two more points for 

Mac. 



JEAN MACCAFERRI 

Sweet personality 

We all agree: 

For school and for class 

She works tirelessly. 



WILLIAM MacDONALD 

We accord him full sup- 
port 

In matters presidential : 

But to the job it cannot 
be 

Such neckties are essen- 
tial. 



Page 15 



ROSE MAJAHAD 

If she had Aladdin's 

lamp, 
We know what she would 

do: 
She'd rub It well and 

make a wish 
For a boy In navy blue. 





*KM 


r 


PEARL MANJIN 


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n 


By studying Fearl in 

study hall 
We can plainly see 
That writing friendly 

letters 
Is her specialty. 


m 



AGNES MAZZANTI 

The theatre may never 

know 
The loss It has sustained; 
But what the stage has 

sacrificed 
The hospital has gained. 



JOHN MELLO 

He may be a bit impul- 
sive, 
Inclined to "argufy" — 
That he is a good worker 
No one can deny. 



ERNESTINE MILLS 

A lovely miss is passing 
by 

And always with such 
winsome smile; 

How true it is our Er- 
nestine 

Could her choice of 
swains beguile ! 



Page 16 




RICHARD MORIN 

While others may such 

tests be taking 
As will help them win 

their silver wings. 
We tell of him who's this 

forsaking — 
To the infantry he 

staunchly clings. 



ROY MORSE 



the 



He's the lad with 
nervous feet ; 

The way he "cuts a rug" 

Leaves us no alterna- 
tive — 

He's the class jitterbug. 



BERNADETTE MURPHY 

When the Latin book's 
open. 

She will have lunched; 

The papers are every- 
where — 

The pencil end's 
crunched. 



JOSEPHINE MUSTO 

In stature diminutive 
She may be; 
No word to apply 
To her industry. 



DOROTHY O'CONNELL 

Intelligent and courte- 
ous — 
Who could ask for more 
Of the girl who serves us 
In Smith's News Store? 



RACHEL OGG 

There's more of Rachel 

in inches 
Than there is to most of 

us — 
While shorter miss may 

taller wish 
To be. she needn't fuss. 



NINA PATTURELLI 

Let wind blow 
Or sun glare. 
She finds the world 
To be most fair. 



LAURA PAVESI 

She has a conscience, 
Won't compromise — 
Makes the decision 
That's honest and wise. 



KENNETH PECK 

Some must follow and 

some must lead: 
Each has his place to 

fill- 
He's managed this and 

managed that 
With a right good will. 



ANNA PEDERZANI 

She's quite immune 
while she evokes 

A lusty high school yell; 

At other times she 
blushes like 

A mid-Victorian belle. 




CLAIRE PEDERZINI 

She neither dreads the 
future 

Nor regrets the past; 

She lives each day abun- 
dantly — 

May the present last! 



AGNES PERRY 

As head librarian 
She's tasted success: 
Proof that endurance 
She must possess. 



DOROTHY PERRY 

Time and money she 

will save 
As the years go by; 
A naturally curly head 

of hair 
Is the reason why. 



LORRAINE PETIT 

If she ever lost them. 
Everyone knows 
She would be helpless 
Without comb and bows. 



JOHN PIMENTAL 

He has a smile that's 

pleasing, 
He has a way that's gay — 
In fact, we think our 

Johnny 
Will go a long, long way. 



Page 17 



LORETTA PIRANI 

Optimistic 
Is her style: 
She will never 
Lose her smile. 



HARRIET POIRIER 

If you have concluded 
That she Is always shy, 
Just bait her with, "HI, 

Hattle;" 
The sparks are sure to 

fly. 



MARY REAGAN 

Telephoning, making 

change, 
Keep her In a whirl — 
For at the local theater 
She Is ticket girl. 



EDWARD REZENDES 

He Is our gay caballero: 
No traditional cinema 

hero — 
But one who knows and 

loves to be 
With Mirth and Jest and 

Jollity. 



ALBERT RONCARATI 

He's not one to ponder 
The complexities of life; 
He'd rather up and at 

them, 
Be active in the strife. 



Page 18 




PRISCILLA ROWE 

Sweetness of manner 
And keenness of mind 
Seldom are found 
So nicely combined. 



NATALIE SAMPSON 

For panoply 
And vain display 
She'll not desert 
The simple way. 



FRANCIS SCHEID 

Whispering In study, 
Giggling in the hall: 
Franny must tell Jeanle 
Though the heavens fall. 



FLORINE SCHORTMAN 

When she hears the roar 

of planes. 
Her heart Just skips a 

beat — 
But the Air Corps has 

priorities 
With which she can't 

compete. 



LILLIAN SHAW 

She nearly met her 
Waterloo, 

Or Dunkirk may be bet- 
ter: 

At any rate she thought 
at times 

That quatrains sure 
would get her. 



VERNA SHAW 

On a November Saturday 
When cheering's long 

and loud, 
If brother's on the ball 

field, 
Then Verna's in the 

crowd. 



JESSIE SHERMAN 

She doesn't look for 

trouble 
As through the day she 

goes: 
She sees no point in 

stepping 
On other people's toes. 



FRANCIS SILVA 

King Arthur had a loyal 

friend — 
Excalibur, his sword; 
But Francis has more 

confidence 
In his trusty Ford. 



ANN SMITH 

She will arrive quite 

breathless 
Minus this or that — 
Most likely had to run 

pell mell 
Because she stopped to 

chat. 



LILIAN SOUZA 

If she's to be a Nurse 

Cadet, 
As fine as ever they 

come — 
Orders are orders, she 

will learn: 
And that applies to gum. 




NICHOLAS STASINOS 

Full well they succeeded. 
For each boy did his part 
To gladden a basketball 
Manager's heart. 



ROBERTA STEVENS 

To know her is to like 
her, 

Her sense of humor's 
keen — 

She's one of the happi- 
est persons 

That we have ever seen. 



EVALENE SYLVIA 

At the Victoria Bakery 
She's in the midst of 

sweets; 
But from her figure we 

can see 
It isn't much that she 

eats. 



ALVAN TESTONI 

Alvan has a little car: 
We've often wondered 

whether 
Saft'ey pins or chewing 

gum 
Were holding it together. 



ROSE THATCHER 

We may lack discern- 
ment, 

But about her we found 
out 

No single fault or foible 

To inveigh about. 



Page 19 



ANIBEL THIMAS 

A flashing smile Is his 
calling card : 

A pleasant word made 
his stay 

One of lasting pleasant- 
ness 

We've enjoyed from day 
to day. 



LOUISE THOMAS 

She Is tenacious: 

When she's made up her 
mind, 

Our attempts at per- 
suasion 

Are quite futile, we find. 



MELVIN THOMAS 

Not models from "Es- 
quire" but rather "Air 
Trails" 

Are those which catch 
his eye; 

For on earth he'll leave 
his pin-up girls 

While his plane soars 
through the sky. 



SARAH THOMAS 

A different necklace 

every day 
We see around her neck: 
She must buy them by 

the dozen, 
Or possibly by the peck. 



CHARLES TOURGEE 

When he plays his trom- 
bone. 

We enjoy syncopation; 

But his sport Jacket 
holds us 

In shuddering fascina- 
tion. 



Page 20 




FREDERICK VACCHI 

We hear the band re- 
hearsing 

And hesitate to hum: 

The little man most 
rhythmic 

Is our Freddy on his 
drum. 



VILMA VALERIANI 

She is a most 
Engaging person: 
Receptionist 
To Dr. Hirson. 



ROBERT VanAMBURGH 

Of those who grieve 
When Robert leaves. 
Of one we're sure: 
R. V. T. Steeves. 



VIRGINIA VANNAH 

She speaks in accents 
So sweet and low 
The gist of her story 
We do not know. 



BERNARD VERRE 

No Hercules on the foot- 
ball field. 

A streak on the basket- 
ball floor — 

Yet his service Is tre- 
mendous 

In building up the score. 



MARJORIE WHITE 

A lovely speaking voice, 
'tis said, 

Is woman's greatest 
boon; 

She has the most melo- 
dious 

We've heard in many a 
moon. 



RENO ZAMMARCHI 

A flash of color, 
The wink of an eye — 
That's right — Doc Bones 
Is passing by. 




ORETCHEN WINTER 

We are as sure that we 

shall see her 
As we are that day will 

break; 
For to pick up teachers' 

menus 
Sh,e her rounds must 

make. 



HAROLD FORNACIARI 

Like wise men before 

him 
We hear him intone, 
"He travels fastest 
Who travels alone." 





ass — )ona 

A PLEDGE FOR TOMORROW 

Life's jeweled cup with glittering gems, 

Rich wine with ruddy glow, 
But flash and gleam above dark dregs 

Of bitterness below. 

So peace, which for one blissful hour, 

May brightly, purely burn, 
Yet at the next be smothered out, 

To cold, gray ashes turn. 

Most dismal do these thoughts seem now 

As we behold the past; 
How can we realize sweet hopes, 

Establish peace at last? 

Let's pledge to forbears brave and proud, 

To youth in life's ascent, 
That Faith, God's Love, and shining Truth 

May reign omnipotent. 

Ruth Dale '44 



Page 21 



^jrrom ^jrar and V fear 

Excerpts from Servicemen 

I have been places since the last time I wrote. I was in Italy 
just about long enough to visit Naples a few times, and I also paid 
a visit to Mt. Vesuvius. 

England is the best place I have been in so far overseas, mainly 
because I do not have to sleep on the ground anymore. We live 
now in comfortable metal barracks, fifteen men to each. We have 
wooden beds with hay matresses. A small coal stove supplies us 
with heat. The first one out of bed in the morning lights the stove. 

Right now I am wondering how long my patience can endure. 
I am going on a nine-day furlough, and I am waiting for my com- 
manding officer to sign my furlough pass. I am going to spend 
most of my time in Scotland. It is the first I have had since I have 
been in the Army. 

Pfc. Peter Sa 

England 

Well, I made aviation radio school and I am going to start 
classes Monday. The course sounds difficult; 20 weeks radio and 
radar, then 8 weeks ordnance, then 3 months operations. 

I like it here very much in Jacksonville, and there are several 
U. S. O.'s here. The regulations here are very strict, but I get 
along very well. 

In classes down here, if you close your eyes to yawn, you miss 
several questions on your test at the end of the week. 

I would really like to see that student talent assembly in school. 
I bet it's going to be good. 

Good luck on your jeep campaign. I hope vou reach your goal. 

" Milton Fuller '44 
Jacksonville. Florida 

There is a native village nearby which is very amusing. It 
has been rumored that some years ago they were savage head- 
hunters, but now they are quite civilized and even speak some 
English. They respect the American uniform and sometimes, when 
they see us, they throw us a high ball (slang for salute) . Their 
dress is very comical. They wear a cloth around their waist, and 
the native women wear grass skirts. They have a mass of bushy 
hair; some have brown, black, and even red hair. 

A few days ago I ventured into the jungles and mountains. The 
jungles are so thick that sometimes we cannot see our hands be- 
fore us. It is more work to beat up the tropical insects than it is 
to hack the trail through the jungles. It was tough going scaling 
the treacherous mountains. After spending an entire day out there, 
my curiosity is gone. The things I missed I will take for granted 
from now on! 

Pvt. George Fontaine 
"Somewhere in New Guinea" 
Page 22 



Since I arrived in Sicily, I have visited Catania and Palermo. 
Both cities are similar, but I still wouldn't trade them for the small- 
est town in the States. The island is like heaven in comparison 
to the dry, dusty, and treeless Africa. The roads are paved, not 
with tar, but with large flat stones which make riding on the whole 
very comfortable. There is no real shopping center, but instead 
the stores can be found on almost any street. There are no large 
stores, but only small shops made from one room of a house. When 
these shops are closed, a large piece of sheet metal is pulled down 
over both the windows and doors. The variety of goods on sale at 
the stores is small, and the prices are extremely high. I also visited 
Mt. Etna and have climed to the top of it. 

Sgt. Frederick Wirtzburger 

England 

Amarillo is in the middle of the Texas Panhandle and certainly 
is barren country. "The sands of Amarillo keep a-getting in my 
pillow," and that's no lie. The wind is terrific, and often we are un- 
able to see down the street during one of the frequent sand storms. 
The evenings are beautiful. The air is crisp and clear, and the sky 
is a maze of twinkling dots laid on dark velvet. If it were only like 
California during the day! 

Our classification tests are finished at last, and they were diffi- 
cult. Much emphasis is placed upon the psychological tests. I made 
the highest scores possible for navigator or bombardier, but not so 
high for pilot. I asked to be navigator and sincerely hope I make it. 

Pvt. Robert Wilson 
Amarillo, Texas 

Right now I'm sitting with my feet in Tennessee mud, trying 
to finish this letter before darkness stops my attempts at contact 
with the "outside world." 

To discuss the weather in Tennessee would be to write an essay 
on the advantages and disadvantages of cloudbursts. This morning 
my tent mate and I awoke to find ourselves treading water in our 
pup tent. The entire morning was then spent in a vain attempt to 
dry out my dampened frame. Never would I have believed it 
possible for it to rain so much for so long a time. 

Pvt. Richard Kearsley 
Fort Jackson, South Carolina 

This is my last day at Chapel Hill, and I am very glad that it 
is. Although eleven weeks have passed, it seems like only yester- 
day that I arrived. The thing that surprised me was the studies! 
I got through them all with very little trouble. I enjoyed celestial 
navigation most. That is where the interpolation taught me in 
high school came into play. 

Robert Tedeschi 
Naval Aviation Cadet 
Pensacola, Florida 

Page 23 



Today I attended church servic2S in our chapel, built entirely 
of native material except for the cement "deck" (floor) . I've 
always known of buildings made of grass and bark, but I'd never 
seen any until I got out here. One mess hall is made entirely of 
rough lumber and roofed with a white bark that grows here. The 
chapel is built of the same material, but is roofed with grass. It 
has a screened opening all the way round. It's about four feet from 
the floor and reaches to the roof. This provides good light and 
ventilation. It really is beautiful with a rustic cross on the roof, and 
the doors open directly below. 

How is everything in school? It's almost over now. I'm sure 
going to miss seeing the graduation exercises. Two months now 
and it will be a year since I've been over here, but I guess I've still 
got a lot to go. It sure will be great to see Plymouth again! ! ! 
Pfc. Joseph B. Sylvia (Marine Air Group) 

'Somewhere in the Pacific" 

It's very hot here. It's the summer season, and we get a sun- 
burn in fifteen minutes, and a tan in a few days. We work six and 
a half days a week, and get half a day off. I'm all grease from head 
to foot. I have to wash my clothes practically every other day. 

The cars travel on the left hand side of the road here. We get 
paid in Australian money. At first it was difficult, but now we 
know how to use it and also how to spend it. Practically every- 
thing is rationed here including ice. clothes, and shoes, — but meat 
is unrationed and a steak dinner costs only forty-eight cents. 

We live in pyramid tents, five men to a tent. The food is very 
good, and we have free outdoor movies, two P. X.'s, and three 
chapels. 

Pfc. John Youngman 
"Somewhere in Australia" 

Some of the Arabs are lazy, and they are sly businessmen. The 
first month here they charged small prices for their merchandise, 
but, when they saw how much we had, they raised their prices sky 
high. 

Here the soldiers become shrewd businessmen — or at least try 
to be. They make the Arabs cut open a melon and, if they think 
it is good, they ask the price. The G.I.'s try to bring the price down, 
but the Arabs are stubborn. The G.I.'s price goes up a little, and the 
Arab's goes down a little. But the G.I. knows that the Arab has to 
get rid of the melon since it is cut. The G.I. mentions his price 
again, and the Arab fails to agree. The G.I. simply walks away as 
if he isn't interested, but not too fast — for he knows that the Arab 
will call him back. Sometimes it doesn't happen, but most of the 
time it works — but, even if the G.I. gets the melon, he knows that 
he has been overcharged. 

There are several classes of Arabs. I know very little about 
the upper class. They always look clean and neat. We usually see 
them in the towns or city during the day, hardly ever at night. 

Pfc. Manuel Amaral 

Africa 

Page 24 



K^lass 1/1/ lit and ^Je^L 



amen 



t 



BE it remembered that we, the opulent Class of 1944, being 
of sound mind and memory, do hereby declare this our 
last will and testament, and do devise and bequeath the 
following tokens of esteem to our beloved faculty who although 
impoverished by our departure, may be enriched by our bequests. 



To Miss Iris Albertini 

A leather-bound edition of her literary accom- 
plishments in the realm of poetry. 




To Mrs. Helen Bagnall 

A heliccopter to facilitate week-end jaunts to 
the base where the Lieutenant is stationed. 





*rm 



To Mrs. Louise Bearse 

A gold-plated pencil with which to carry out 
her persistent threat of listing the names of 
recalcitrant pupils. 



To Mrs. Margaret Brown 

A rapid transit car for the speedy conveyance 
of fifth and sixth period loiterers. 





To Mrs. Viola Figueiredo 

A pair of asbestos gloves for each of her would- 
be cooks to prevent catastrophes in the kitchen. 



Page 25 




mgmmggm 



To Mrs. Beatrice E. Garvin 



A first-period gym class which finds strenuous 
exercise exhilarating at that hour of the 
morning. 



To Miss F. Olive Hey 

A cow which may graze in the vicinity of room 
203 to supply her with her favorite drink. 





4% 



To Miss Jeanette C. Jacques 

A sound-proof wall to be erected between 103 
and 104 so that the mysteries of French gram- 
mar may be explained without competition. 



To Miss Helen Johnson 

A gold-fringed satin cushion to elevate her to 
a position where all study hall pupils may be 
scrutinized. 





To Miss Lydia E. Judd 

A medal of appreciation for the innumerable 
programs and other mimeographed material 
made possible by her department. 



To Miss Elizabeth C. Kelly 

An automaton whose sole function would be to 
transport little messages to Miss Locklin. 



Page 26 





To Mr. David R. Kingman 

Our sincere wish for a speedy recovery. 



To Miss Marion La Fountain 

A miniature radar system to enable pupils to 
locate her after school. 





To Miss Katherine J. Lang 

A long-handled contraption for shutting senior 
lockers as she patrols the corridor each morning. 



To Miss Nellie R. Locklin 

A highly -polished, hand-decorated set of geo- 
metric figures for effective demonstration to 
students of higher mathematics. 





To Mr. Edgar J. Mongan 

A suit of red flannels to keep him warm on 
Coast Guard patrols. 



To Mr. Theodore Packard 

A set of ruffled organdy curtains for the beau- 
tification of the "house" built by electricity 
students. 




Page 27 




To Miss Amy Rafter 

A recording of her voice (made of pre-war 
materials for durability i to be played each time 
she feels the urge to ask, ''Are there any ques- 
tions or comments?" 



To Mrs. Miriam A. Raymond 

Another class as ingenioiLs as we in the art of 
bulletin board decoration. 





To Mr. Mario J. Romano 

An escalator to prevent the lamentable con- 
gestion of pupils which now exists on the west 
staircase. 



To Mr. Louis Rudolph 

A basketball team which can carry on the glori- 
ous precedent established by us. 





To Mr. Reginald V. T. Steeves 

A sizable plot of land to help him realize his 
dream of an aeronautics laboratory. 



To Mrs. Alice Urann 

A secluded corner in which to conduct an advice- 
to-the-lovelorn bureau. 



Page 28 





To Mrs. Amelia Vincent 

Three jeeps to carry the band to concerts at 
the South Street camp. 



. ■ 



To Miss Margie Wilber 

The satisfaction that Latin is not a dead lan- 
guage as proved daily in her sixth period class. 





To Mrs. Marion Longever 

The ability to say "No!" when asked to do 
favors. 



A JUNIOR SPEAKS 



Throughout the years we undergrads 
To be Seniors long have yearned; 
While we watch and wait and study hard, 
This lesson we have learned : 

That Seniors have the preference, 
They rule o'er us supreme; 
Their word is law, we must obey — 
They're high in our esteem! 

Yes, "Tempus Fugit" — they can 6ay, 
Their years of toil are through — 
We still have one more year to wait, 
One more year's work to do'. 



The girls were much too old for us; 
Aloof, reserved, blase; 
That is, until the Draft Board called 
And took their men away. 

We'll profit by their precedent 
When we reach the journey's end. 
We won't be so haughty — 
On that you may depend. 

The Seniors think they're sapient 

Mortals set apart — 

But they are not infallible, 

We know they're kids at heart! 



-Sally Beaman '45 



A SENIOR REPLIES 



In prewar days we envied them, 

The seniors, all supreme; 

And now at last we've reached our goal, 

Fulfillment of our dream. 

But when the world became engulfed 
In hopeless, bitter strife, 
We soon became aware that we 
Enjoyed no halcyon life. 

The underclassmen need not grieve — 
Their classes still intact — 
While many senior boys are here 
In fancy, not in fact. 



The frantic rush and final plans 
When June fifteenth comes 'round 
Can't wait fill spring, our work begins 
While snow is on the ground. 

Class pictures, yearbook on our minds — 
We have scant time for fun: 
But, when we've left, we shall recall 
With gladness all we've done. 

O juniors, sophomores, listen well, 
Be wise, and "carpe diem" — 
Don't envy those ahead of you, 
Fcr all t?o soon you'll be 'em! 

— Joan Eldridge '44 



Page 29 



Ljotd J^)tar5 and (/Stack rvlamc 



PERSON 

Richard Drew 
Joan Eldridge 
Bernard Verre 
Elide Benati 
Isabel Brown 
Alton Giovanetti 
Jeanette Goddard 

Harold Caramello 
Lillian Shaw 
Donald Dassman 
Virginia Grandi 
Ralph Fortini 
Norma Gilli . . 
David Maccaferri 
Anna Pederzani 
Ronald Leary 
Agnes Mazzanti . 

Alvan Testoni 
Cynthia Holmes 
William MacDonald 
Robert VanAmburgh 
Frances Scheid . . 
Corinne Jenney . . 



ACHIEVEMENT 

mastering the bass viol 

forgetting physics assignments 

finding the best pin-up girls 

breaking the most hearts 

getting the most "A's" 

driving the flashiest '31 Ford 

having the greatest variety of army in- 
signia 

being the best all-round athlete 

misplacing the most books 

having the best supply of chewing gum 

shrieking the loudest 

being the most verbose 

fretting the most over Latin translations 

making the most side-remarks 

being the staunchest football enthusiast 

fitting three cozily into his car 

following Frank Sinatras career most 
closely 

having the greatest amount of gas 

having the finest singing voice 

wincing the most at his middle name 

being the best title mythologist 

doodling the most in History III 

being the most talented pianist 



For eight years the National Society Daughters of the American 
Revolution has invited the senior class in high schools throughout 
the country to choose its Best Girl Citizen. This honor is awarded 
to the girl who possess to an outstanding degree the qualities of 
dependability, service, leadership, and patriotism. This year Isabel 
Brown was selected by her classmates, and this choice was approved 
by the faculty, as most deserving of the title of Best Girl Citizen. 

During her sophomore year, Isabel was a committee member 
for the Sophomore Hop, took an active part in Junior Red Cross 
activities, and played a leading role in the Gay Nineties Review. 
As a junior she became a member of the Press Club, represented 
this organization in the Student Activities Society, and served on 
the decoration committee for the Junior Promenade. In her senior 
year she participated in the Christmas Assembly, served as Editor- 
in-Chief of "Till Victory," and wrote the Senior Class Poem. 

She has been a Glee Club member since the seventh grade, 
and was active in the Girl Scout organization until last year. For 
the entire three years of her high school career, Isabel's name has 
appeared on the Honor Roll for highest honors. A member of the 
National Honor Society, she naturally became enrolled as a junior 
member of the Plymouth Woman's Club. 

The Class of 1944 is confident that its choice of Best Girl Citizen 
is a wise one. 

Joan Eldridge. '44 
Page 30 



^Jimes —J^rave L^kanaed 



t 



Did you realize that ten years ago, although the Class of '34 
graduated in a year of peace, its members were, for the most part, 
born during the first World War and were destined to play a 
prominent part in the raging conflict now taking place? Of the 
number now proudly serving their country, perhaps the most 
prominent is Captain Leroy Schreiber. Ten years ago he was 
doubtless an uncertain and bashful senior in the Plymouth High 
School. Now he is a fearless pilot who has already been decorated 
for his gallant service. 

We grumble about gas rationing and complain about the fun 
other high school seniors had when there were no gas restrictions. 
But, looking back, we see that they, too, had their troubles. For 
ten years ago money was scarce and jobs were scarcer. Although 
there were gas and tires available, few pupils could afford a car. 

Our curriculum is approximately the same as was provided 
for the Class of 1934, but war conditions have made it necessary 
to offer six new subjects, which, 'tis hoped, will help to prepare 
us for both a world at war and a postwar world. 

Ten years ago a senior boy expected to graduate and go to 
work, but six of our classmates are already in the armed forces — 
and many more will be directly after graduation. At this time 
we should like to pay tribute to the members of our class already 
in the service: Milton Fuller, Joseph Leandro, Frank Dunlap, 
Ralph Ghelli, Walter Roberts, and Warren Kourtz. We are justly 
proud of Ted Collas who left us for service in the armed forces 
during his junior year. 

Ten years ago the Senior Class chose for class officers Law- 
rence Bongiovanni, president; William Brewster, vice-president; 
Florence Armstrong, secretary; and Marion Zandi, treasurer. Now 
Lawrence Bongiovanni has returned to school as a substitute 
teacher, and William Brewster is serving his country in China. 
Florence Armstrong and Marion Zandi have both married. 

Another prominent member of the Class of '34 was Shirley 
Dutton, who in that year wrote "All Hail to Plymouth High", 
which still serves as the school song. 

The sports activities of our class and the Class of '34 were 
quite similar. While ten years ago the players were transported 
by bus, we journeyed to all our games by automobile. The Class 
of '34 had a very successful basketball season, winning all its 
scheduled games with the exception of two, but suffering defeat 
in the semi-final round of the tournament at Brockton by Abing- 
ton, who went on to win the tournament and gain permanent pos- 
session of the Kiwanis trophy. On the other hand, its football 
team had a most disastrous season winning one, tying another, and 
losing six games. Under Coaches Bagnall and Smith the school 
also had an excellent baseball team and a splendid track team. 
Very probably the most prominent athletes of the time were "Babe" 
James, "Art" Strassel, and Dunham Rogers. 

It has been said that comparisons are odious, but they can be 
interesting — and illuminating. William MacDonald 

Page 31 






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SEPTEMBER 

Wed. 8 Today new school citizens crowded into the corridors, 
observing and imitating upperclassmen, while seniors 
went nonchalantly on their way discussing summer vaca- 
tions and programs. 

Slat. 25 The football squad played its first game of the season 
against Abington at Stephens Field. 

Mon. 27 Mrs. Helen Bagnall initiated the organization of the Junior 
Press Club this week in order that high school news 
might soon be published in all local papers. 

Wed. 29 The sale of war bonds and stamps, sponsored by the S. A. 
S. under the direction of Miss Elizabeth Kelly, was intro- 
duced in place of school banking with the goal $2090, the 
cost of an amphibian jeep. 

OCTOBER 

Mon. 4 Ninety-one girls registered for Junior Red Cross work. 
Some volunteered to knit, others to make surgical dress- 
ings, while still others joined the regulation Home Nursing 
course taught by Mrs. Stanley Wood. 

Mon. 11 The members of the Senior Class elected their class 
officers. 

Mon. 11 At the Columbus Day assembly the school was delighted 
at an unexpected visit from Sgt. John Pacheco. He 
accepted Mr. Mongan's invitation to act as guest con- 
ductor of the band. 

Thu. 14 Every home room was asked to support the National 
Clothing Crusade for the benefit of the needy inhabitants 
of our Southern mountain regions and Great Britain. 
The support given this cause was commendable. 

NOVEMBER 
Wed. 3 The English film, "Target for Tonight", was brought to 

the school by the S. A. S. to make us more keenly aware 

of the work of the R. A. F. 
Wed. 10 Armistice Day was celebrated by an assembly at which 

Rev. A. R. Hussey recalled his memories of November 

11, 1918. 
Wed. 10 Lt. John Packard, a former faculty member, visited the 

school this -afternoon on his way to Quonset Point, R. I. 
Wed. 10 The Senior Class held its annual dance, which proved to 

be profitable to its treasury and enjoyable to its many 

supporters. 
Wed. 17 Tonight many interested parents came to confer with 

the teachers about beloved offspring. This was the 

Page 34 



traditional Parents' Night intended to promote closer 
cooperation between parent and teacher. 

Wed. 17 The S. A. S. presented its first Pitt Parker Assembly, in 
which a clever cartoonist presented current events pic- 
torially with interesting and amusing comments on each. 

Tue. 23 "Rededication of Ourselves to the Pilgrim Ideals" was 
the topic upon which Mr. Paul Bittinger spoke in the 
Thanksgiving Day assembly. His speech was preceded 
by a solo by Cynthia Holmes and the Governor's Proc- 
lamation read by William MacDonald. 

Tue, 23 To promote the sale of war stamps the S. A. S. planned 
the dance held tonight with attractive silhouettes of 
planes and jeeps as decorations. 

DECEMBER 

Thu. 2 Mjss Marian Park, former president of Bryn Mawr 

College, spoke to the student body about its responsibility 

in solving post-war problems. Miss Park also told of 

her experiences in Germany at the time of World War I. 

Fri. 10 The boys' basketball team journeyed to Duxbury for its 
first game of the season. 

Mon. 13 Two hundred and sixty Junior and Senior English books 
were sent to the Methodist Home Missions Institution for 
Mexican boys and girls. Money for this purpose was 
donated by "The Pilgrim". 

Thu. 23 This morning the "Spirit of Christmas in 1943" was pre- 
sented in five scenes by the members of the French classes 
under the supervision of Miss Jeanette Jacques. Mrs. 
Brown's art classes assisted with the stage properties. 

Thu. 23 Tonight the members of the football squad at its annual 
dance asked Coach Louis Rudolph to announce that 
Richard Morini and Roy Randall had been elected co- 
captains of next year's squad. 

Wed. 29 Many couples enjoyed the colorful Holiday Dance held at 
the Winslow House. All the arrangements were made by 
the Junior Red Cross Surgical Dressings Group. The 
music was furnished by Carlo David's Orchestra, and the 
mothers prepared simple refreshments. 

JANUARY 
Mon. 3 The Students returned to school with many fine resolu- 
tions for the coming year. 

Mon. 10 Mrs. Figueiredo's boys' cooking class packed boxes for 
four of the seniors who have entered the service, and two 
more were sent to alumni who are hospitalized in this 
country after having seen foreign service. 

Page 35 



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The Student Activities Society this year completes ten years of active par- 
ticipation in and sponsorship of school affairs. It was established in 
1934 by the Massasoit Chapter of National Honor Society 



Tue. 25 Tests were given to those boys interested in either Army 
or Naval Aviation by officials from both services. 

Thu. 26 In memory of Mr. Wayne B. Slhipman, the entire student 
body and faculty stood in silent prayer for this former 
principal, a victim of infantile paralysis. 

FEBRUARY 
Fri. 11 Mr. Mongan in an assembly named the Best Girl Citizen 
in the opinion of the senior class and faculty. The award 
was given to Isabel Brown, who later attended a dinner 
in, Boston given by the Daughters of the American Rev- 
olution for the girls selected from the entire state. 

As its money-making project of the year the S. A. S. 
arranged a Valentine Dance for this evening, but the 
enterprise was not successful financially because of a 
severe snowstorm. 

Thu. 17 Gathered in the auditorium this morning pupils were 
fortunate enough to see the film "Emperor Jones", ob- 
tained for the school by Mrs. Alice Urann and paid for 
by the S. A. S. 

Fri. 18 At an assembly celebrating the birthdays of Abraham 
Lincoln and George Washington Supt. Burr F. Jones ad- 
dressed the school on "The Four Crises". During this 
period Cynthia Holmes, Jeannette Goddard, Richard 
Drew, and George Avery appeared before the student 
body for the first time as a quartet. 

Tue. 29 After one day of classes following vacation, the S. A. S. 
arranged for the school to go en masse to a special showing 
of the "Watch on the Rhine" at the Old Colony Theatre. 

MARCH 
Thu. 8 This morning those elected to the National Honor Society 
took the pledge of membership in this group, while old 
members renewed their allegiance, in a very impressive 
candlelight service. Mr. Mongan congratulated the mem- 
bers for their unselfish service to the school, their leader- 
ship, fine character, and scholastic achievement. 

Tue. 16 Sixteen Seniors, who in three years of High School have 
maintained an average of eighty-five per cent or better, 
were named as the members of the Honor Group. It is 
the responsibility of these pupils to plan the graduation 
exercises. 

Thu. 16 The Red Cross film, "Hand in Hand", was shown to the 
school to induce pupil participation in the Red Cross War 
Fund Drive. 

Fri. 17 Cynthia Holmes and Corinne Jenney were appointed by 
the S. A. S. to arrange a Talent Assembly, which was 

Page 37 



presented today. So great was the success of this ex- 
periment that Mr. Mongan promised one more after 
vacation. 

Mon. 20 The senior class enjoyed the first of the traditional Get- 
Togethers tonight despite very stormy weather. Ann 
Smith, chairman of the committee responsible for these 
socials, acted as mistress of ceremonies. 

Tue. 21 In recognition of the accomplishment of our basketball 
team in the Brockton tournament, a short assembly was 
held to honor these boys and those who worked with them 
on their road to victory. 

APRIL 
Tue. 11 Those pupils who had been faithful members of the band 
for one, two, or three years received a school letter today. 

Fri. 14 The Sophomore Hop ! The big event in the life of the 
Class of '46 was held in the gymnasium with Kenneth 
Telfer as general chairman. 

Today "Till Victory" went to press, much to the relief 
of the staff and faculty adviser. 




MEMORY BOOK STAFF 

Front Row: Elide Benati, Barbara Carmichael. Joan Eldridge, David Crawley, Isabel 
Brown, Harold Caramello, Anna Pederzani, Nancy Bartlett. Arlene Bourne 

Second Row: Dorothy O'Connell. Lillian Shaw, Priscilla Rowe. Ruth Dale. Frances 
Scheid. Ernestine Mills, Cynthia Holmes 

Third Row: Robert Silva, Ralph Fortini, Harry Hanson. David Maccaferri. Robert 
VanAmburgh, David Goldstein, Richard Drew, Richard Baiboni, William Mac- 
Donald 



Page 38 



<? £ 


/ VM W „■ 


— )aw _7 


t l/wttk Vv IviSic 


Robert Agnone 


'With My Head In The Clouds" 


Enis Almeida 


'The Lady In Red" 


Agnes Alsheimer 


•What's Cookin'?" 


Florence Alves 


'I'm Happy" 


Enis Amaral 


'Brown Eyes" 


Lucy Amaral 


'Beautiful Lady In Blue" 


Julia Andrews 


'Don't Let Julia Fool You" 


Beverly Armstrong 


'You Rascal, You" 


Robert Arnold 


'The Boy With The Wistful Eyes" 


Eva Bagni 


'Keep Smilin', Keep Laughin', Be Happy" 


Louise Balboni 


'Smile Awhile" 


Nancy Bartlett 


'Who Wouldn't Love You?' 


Elide Benati 


'How Sweet You Are" 


Stanley Bernagozzi 


Daydreaming" 


Arlene Borgatti 


'Oh, Lady Be Good" 


Gloria Borghesani 


'Innocent Eyes" 


Gino Borsari 


'I've Got Rhythm" 


Arlene Bourne 


'A Little Bit of Heaven" 


Barbara Boutin 


'It's so Peaceful In The Country" 


Bernard Brabant 


'Play, Fiddle, Play" 


Grace Briggs 


'She's A Good Fellow" 


Isabel Brown 


'I'm Shooting High" 


Harold Caramello 


'You've Got To Be A Football Hero" 


Prudence Carbone 


'Coast Guard Forever" 


Barbara Carmichael 


'Sparkle In Your Eyes" 


Helen Carreira 


'There Will Never Be Another You" 


Clyfton Chandler 


'Having A Lovely Time" 


Joan Chiari 


'This Is No Laughing Matter" 


Olga Cocchi 


'That Soldier Of Mine" 


Shirley Cox 


Little Cotton Dolly" 


David Crawley 


'I Want A Zoot Suit" 


Ruth Dale 


'The Fleet's In" 


Ruth Daley 


'Hi, Neighbor" 


Donald Dassman 


'Easy Street" 


Leonore DeCarli 


'What A Girl!" 


Andrew Dietlin 


'If I Could Be Where I Want To Be" 


Shirley Douglas 


'Star Eyes" 


Richard Drew 


'Strictly Instrumental" 


Virginia Drew 


'Don't Be Blue, Little Pal" 


Joan Eldridge 


'Traffic Jam" 


Frances Fernandes 


'Whispering" 


Leo Fontaine 


'Remember Me" 


Harold Fornaciari 


'You Take The High Road" 


Ralph Fortini 


'Jack of All Trades" 


John Gilli 


'Mr. Five By Five" 


Norma Gilli 


•Kitten On The Keys" 


Alton Giovanetti 


'Big Boy" 


Milton Glassman 


'Blow, Gabriel, Blow" 


Jeanette Goddard 


'Jeannie With The Light Brown Hair" 


David Goldstein 


'What Do You Do In The Infantry?" 


Virginia Grandi 


'All In Fun" 


Norman Guidaboni 


'Cooking On The Front Burner" 


Lois Gunther 


'Lovely To Look At" 


Helen Gustavson 


'Chatterbox" 


Robert Haire 


'Take It Easy" 


Janet Holman 


'A Pretty Girl" 


Bernard Holmes 


'He's A Right Guy" 


Cynthia Holmes 


'The Song is You" 


Corinne Jenney 


'Piano Concerto" 


George Jesse 


T Do What I Want, As Long As I Can" 



Page 40 



Barbara Johnson 


"Speak Low" 


Madeline LaForest 


"Shoot The Sherbert To Me, Herbert" 


Prank Lahey 


"One, Two, Three, Kick" 


Richard Lapham 


"Pass The Biscuits, Mirandy" 


Ronald Leary 


"Prince Charming" 


Gloria Longhi 


"I'm Not The Same Old Me" 


David Maccaferri 


"Shoe Shine Boy" 


Jean Maccaferri 


"One In A Million" 


William MacDonald 


"Little Man, You've Had A Busy Day" 


Rose Majahad 


"Happy Go Lucky" 


Pearl Manjin 


"Just One You" 


Agnes Mazzanti 


"Music In My Heart" 


John Mello 


"I'll Get By" 


Ernestine Mills 


"Sweet Sue" 


Richard Morin 


"For He's A Jolly Good Fellow" 


Roy Morse 


"You're Easy To Dance With" 


Bernadette Murphy 


"When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" 


Josephine Musto 


"Small Fry" 


Dorothy O'Connell 


"Oh, How I Hate To Get Up In The Morning" 


Rachel Ogg 


"Mamma, Long and Tall" 


Nina Patturelli 


"Time To Sing" 


Laura Pavesi 


"The Sunshine of Your Simile" 


Kenneth Peck 


"Going My Way" 


Anna Pederzani 


"They Always, Always Pick on Me" 


Claire Pederzani 


"Not A Care In The World" 


Agnes Perry 


"I'm Just A Little In Between" 


Dorothy Perry 


"Love Me As I Am" 


Lorraine Petit 


"You're A Sweet Little Headache" 


John Pimental 


"Oh, Johnny" 


Loretta Pirani 


"You'd Better Not Roll Those Big Blue Eyes" 


Harriet Poirier 


"Little Miss Muffet" 


Mary Reagan 


"Mary's A Grand Old Name" 


Edward Rezendes 


"Dark Eyes" 


Albert Roncarati 


"A Romantic Guy, I" 


Priscilla Rowe 


"Oh, What A Pal" 


Natalie Sampson 


"Nursie, Nursie" 


Prances Scheid 


"Junior Miss" 


Florine Schortman 


"Sophisticated Lady" 


Lillian Shaw 


"I Didn't Know What Time It Was" 


Verna Shaw 


"Take It Slow" 


Jessie Sherman 


"Happy Mood" 


Francis Silva 


"Life Is Fine" 


Ann Smith 


"All The Things You Are" 


Lilian Souza 


"May I Have This Dance?" 


Nicholas Stasinos 


"Heave Ho! My Lads!" 


Roberta Stevens 


"Pretty Little Busybody" 


Evalene Sylvia 


"Well, All Right, Then" 


Alvan Testoni 


"Curly-headed Baby" 


Rose Thatcher 


"Only A Rose" 


Anibel Thimas 


"On The Beam" 


Louise Thomas 


"Forget-Me-Not" 


Melvin Thomas 


"Swing High, Swing Low" 


Sarah Thomas 


"Fidgety Feet" 


Charles Tourgee 


"Sweet And Low" 


Frederick Vacchi 


"Beat It" 


Vilma Valeriani 


"Let's Dance" 


Robert VanAmburgh 


"I Dood It" 


Virginia Vannah 


"I Want To Be A Cowboy's Sweetheart" 


Bernard Verre 


"Little Curly Hair" 


Marjorie White 


"Crazy Rhythm" 


Gretchen Winter 


"Shout, Sister, Shout" 


Reno Zammarchi 


"Lazy Bones" 



Page 41 




Page 42 



Ljridlron / fot 




es 



Of the thirty-five boys 
who reported for football 
only two were veterans, 
Captain Harold Caramello 
at fullback and "Dutch" 
Morini at left half. 

After two weeks of 
practice under Coaches Ru- 
dolph and Romano, the boys 
met a heavy, experienced 
Abington eleven which, in- 
cidentally, went on to cap- 
ture a tie for the Class C 
Championship. In the first 
half Plymouth was bewildered, but proved a stubborn opponent in 
the second, although the game ended in a 19-0 defeat. 

Next came Rockland — and how! 

Displaying an amazing, razzle dazzle offense to a lighter than 
usual, less experienced team than Plymouth has had for some 
time, Rockland trounced Plymouth 26-6. 

The third game was against an undefeated Middleboro eleven 
which enjoyed one of its best seasons in years. Captain Caramello's 
forty-yard jaunt for a touchdown after intercepting a Middleboro 
pass featured Plymouth's triumph in a game in which the aerial 
offenses of both teams predominated. Plymouth's modified "T" for- 
mation, used for the first time this season, proved successful enough 
to ensure victory. 

The next game was against Milton Academy, a new opponent 
from the prep school ranks. Jupe Pluvius brought havoc to Plym- 
outh's "T" formation and zip passes over the center of the line. 
Result: Milton Academy 20, Plymouth 6. 

The annual classic with a strong and heavy Whitman team 
climaxed the season. An alert and greatly improved Plymouth 
football team turned a scoreless contest into a 6-0 victory, when 
Leno Atti, Plymouth's rugged guard, recovered a Whitman fumble 
on Whitman's eleven-yard line. With two minutes of play re- 
maining, Captain Caramello smashed over from the seven-yard 
line for the only score of the game. 

At this point Plymouth was dealt a severe blow by Uncle Sam. 
Joe Leandro, talented end, received his "greetings". He is now in 
the U. S. Marines. 

With Captain Caramello romping for three touchdowns, one 
of which was a forty-five yard sprint from Plymouth's tricky "T", 
the schoolboys got back into the victory column in a game with 
Barnstable. 

Then in a contest in which statistics proved nothing, Plymouth 
was outscored but not outplayed. Plymouth made eleven first 
downs to North Quincy's seven, and outrushed the opponent by 
some thirty yards. Yet the local team was outscored 34-6. Re- 
gardless of score, it was an even-Stephen ball game. Just as the 
North Quincy backs got that vital block on the safety man, Plym- 
outh's backs, Caramello and Morini, failed to get the support which 

Page 43 




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they needed. Both men were in the open repeatedly only to be 
tackled by the visitor's safety man. 

Finally came powerful Weymouth which had already clinched 
the Class B title. Again, just as happened in the North Quincy game, 
it was the long runs which tallied against the locals. The Plymouth 
wing men muffed up many scoring chances when they could not hold 
the long passes thrown by Randall and Caramello. The closest 
Plymouth came to scoring was on an end run from the "T" with 
Caramello being pushed out of bounds on the Weymouth one- 
yard line. The Shiretowners then received three successive five- 
yard penalties and, when the fourth down ran out, Plymouth was 
on the Weymouth three-yard line. In spite of this disappointment 
Leno Atti's line work was superb, while Captain Caramello's 
passing and running menaced Weymouth throughout the game. 

SCHEDULE AND SCORES 

Opponents P. H. S. 

Abington 19 

Rockland 26 6 

Middleboro 7 15 

Milton Academy 20 6 

Whitman 6 

Barnstable 6 20 

North Quincy 34 6 

Weymouth 33 

INDIVIDUAL SCORING 

Points after 

Touchdowns Touchdowns Total 

Harold Caramello 8 2 50 

Richard Morini 1 1 7 

Alton Giovanetti safety 2 

Total 59 



Off the Backboard 

With a team made up of 
players with one or more 
years of experience in var- 
sity basketball, Plymouth 
was picked as a winner and 
a formidable opponent by 
"experts" and sports writ- 
ers early in the season. The 
Blue and White lost only 
three out of sixteen games 
in a schedule against tough, 
experienced teams. Much 
of the credit for this suc- 
cessful season goes to Coach 
Jeffrey Nunez for his unswerving faith in the team. 

After scoring two impressive victories over Duxbury and 
Rocky Point Army Post, Plymouth was bested by a fast-moving 
Rockland team by a score of 28 to 21 in a very close game. Two 
more victories over Middleboro and Sagamore Army Post, and 




Page 45 



Plymouth went to Rockland to avenge its previous defeat in one 
of the best games of the year. 

For the second time in the season, Plymouth came out on the 
wrong side of the ledger, beaten 38 to 25 by the strong Coyle of 
Taunton. Plymouth then endured its third and final defeat at the 
hands of New Bedford Textile which had been defeated by Plym- 
outh the week before. In the next game Whitman was over- 
whelmed by Plymouth by the impressive tally of 62 to 21. 

When Coyle came to Plymouth and was defeated on February 
22 by a red-hot Plymouth team, the crowd went wild. It was a 
a fast-moving, hard-fought game, close all the way and full of thrills 
right up until the final whistle. Plymouth had avenged its pre- 
vious defeat. This game firmly established Plymouth as a danger- 
ous opponent in the Brockton Tournament even before the victory 
over a scrappy Middleboro five. 

Plymouth High enjoyed an excellent schedule of amateur bas- 
ketball games. It is a credit to those seniors on the team who will 
probably never play scholastic basketball again that the season 
was a success. 

After the season at a special meeting of the team. Robert 
McCosh, one of this year's stars, was elected to pilot next year's 
team to victory. 



South Shore Tournament 

A top-notch Plymouth team, one of the strongest in years, 
was regarded as a final round contender at the very start of the 
tourney. A bye was drawn in the first round, automatically put- 
ting the Blue and White in the quarter-finals. Here Plymouth 
was pitted against a strong Oliver Ames team, and a little diffi- 
culty was encountered in downing the scrappy North Easton five. 
In the final period, however, the Shiretowners emerged victorious 
by the close score of 22 to 19. 

Plymouth encountered Stoughton in the semi-final game. 
Although in the two previous years Stoughton had smashed Plym- 
outh's tourney hopes, this year the Blue and White went out on the 
floor determined to win. Stoughton's advantage in height was 
quickly overcome, and, although the Rubbermakers gave all they 
had, Plymouth won 30 to 25. 

Once again Plymouth reached the final round of the tourna- 
ment. The largest crowd in tourney history thronged to see the 
Blue and White clash with Rockland at the Brockton Y. M. C. A. 

It was perceived early in the game that Plymouth had a slight 
edge. Slowly building up a lead, Plymouth sailed to victory 36 to 
26. For the first time in twelve years the Shiretowners became 
the South Shore Champions. 

Coach Jeffrey Nunez received an engraved plaque and the 
coveted trophy for the school, while silver basketballs were 
awarded to the players. 

Page 46 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 1943-1944 



Date 
December 10 
December 17 
January 7 
January 11 
January 14 
January 18 
January 21 
January 25 
January 28 
February 4 
February 10 
February 15 
February 18 
February 22 
February 25 
March 3 



March 11 
March 15 
March 18 



Opponent 
Duxbury 

Rocky Point Army 
Rockland 
Middleboro 
Sagamore Army 
Rockland 
Clapp Memorial 
Coyle 
Whitman 

New Bedford Textile 
Miramar 

New Bedford Textile 
Whitman 
Coyle 
Duxbury 
Middleboro 



Place 

Away 

Here 

Here 

Away 

Here 

Away 

Here 

Away 

Away 

Here 

Away 

Away 

Here 

Here 

Here 

Here 



Total 



BROCKTON TOURNAMENT 
Oliver Ames Quarter-finals 

Stoughton Semi-finals 

Rockland Finals 

Total 



Opp. 
16 
27 
28 
37 
14 
29 
19 
38 
29 
26 
17 
41 
21 
28 
22 
36 

428 



19 
25 
26 

70 



P.H.S. 
37 
32 
21 
42 
35 
35 
60 
25 
43 
58 
20 
30 
62 
33 
52 
38 

623 



22 
30 
36 

88 




BOYS' BASKETBALL 
Front Row: Richard Buttner, Norman Clark, Henry Govoni, John Lopes, Jr., George Martin, Robert 

Mills 
Second Row: Reno Zammarchi, Bernard Verre, Robert McCosh, Harold Caramello, David Macca- 

ferri, David Crawley, Ralph Fortini 
Third Row: Coach Jeffrey Nunez, Nicholas Stasinos, Melvin Klasky, Roy Randall, Robert Bastoni, 

James Butters, Richard Correa, Robert VanAmburgh, Coach Louis Rudolph 



Page 47 




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With an "ouch" and a "hey" the girls' hockey team began 
practice. It is true that the season did not look too promising 
because of transportation difficulties, but the girls enjoyed every 
minute of it. 

Compared with previous years, a small group reported, but, 
as time passed, enthusiasm grew and a larger group appeared 

The season opened with a thrilling game with Scituate, in 
which Midge Knight was outstanding with her fine dribbling and 
passing. 

The conflict with Marshfield was a hard-fought and tight 
clash with Anna Pederzani making the only goal for Plymouth. 

The contest with Middleboro was exciting and most enjoyable 
because of the good sportsmanship and friendly feelings between 
the teams. 

The succeeding games with Hingham and Middleboro were 
close and attracted many spectators. 

The challenge with Kingston always arouses interest because 
of the rivalry of the teams. It proved to be a well-played game, in 
which Louise Poirier, a sophomore, and Midge Knight distinguished 
themselves. 

The seventh game was played against Scituate, who through 
the years has been one of Plymouth's most difficult opponents. 

The free-for-all with the football squad was played before an 
obviously puzzled crowd. It was a rough and bewildering affair, 
from which the boys emerged triumphant. 

The season ended with the Alumni game on Thanksgiving 
Day. Fourteen girls battled against the school team. 

The members of the hockey team are grateful to Miss Carolyn 
Parren for her instruction, and appreciate the fine work and fighting 
spirit of Captain Anna Pederzani. 

Town Opponents Plymouth 

Scituate 2 2 

Marshfield 2 1 

Middleboro 2 

Hingham 1 

Middleboro 1 

Kingston 2 

Scituate 3 

Football Team 2 1 

Alumni 1 

Totals 12 8 



We hope that our readers will do unto our advertisers 
as they have done unto us. 



Page 50 




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CHEER LEADERS 

Front Row: Lillian Shaw, Elide Benati. Virginia Grandi 
Second Row: Ann Smith. Anna Pederzani. Jean Maccaferri 



Page 54 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Front Row: Robert Bastoni, Herbert Mitchell 
Second Row: Joseph Dietlin, Betty Bearhope 



Page 55 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Front Row: Carolyn Wood, Kenneth Telfer 
Second Row: Catherine Brigida, Richard Buttner 



Page 56 



J^enior J-^oetr 



TODAY'S SKY 

The sky is dull and gray today, 
But only with heavy clouds. 

It's not from the smoke of battle 
Hanging like heavy shrouds. 

The oaks and maples are red today, 
But just from the touch of frost: 

It's not from the blood of soldiers 
In a terrible holocaust. 

The skies will be clear and blue again, 
Spring brings rebirth to each 
tree — 
And from war will emerge the free- 
dom 
That was promised on Calvary. 

— Bernadette Murphy 



f 



FOR THE FUTURE 

A single hill, a single tree, 

A single dusty road; 

The leaves are gone, and winter's on 

Its way, where Autumn glowed. 

There is no war, but here before 
Upon this humble spot 
Perhaps some gallant army stood 
In wars that once we fought. 

It has not come to these, our hills, 
To these, our people's pride, 
But war is waged on foreign shores 
And peaceful countryside. 

A single man, a single mind, 
Has sent a world to war; 
But some day every people 
Shall live in peace once more. 

— Cynthia Holmes 



RHAPSODY IN GRAY 

The strange, sweet days are here 

again, 
The sad, nostalgic days: 
The songs which tremble on our lips 
Are half complaint, half praise. 

Swing, sparrow, on the icy sprays, 
And sing your blithest tune: 
Help us across these barren days 
Into the joys of June. 

— Lillian Shaw 



NEW MOTHER'S PRAYER 

This perfect new-born infant 
Has felt no joy or care 
In such a brief existence; 
What can the future bear? 

I pray this tiny being, 

Innocent of life's trials, 

Will face the world's confusion 

Wreathed not in tears, but smiles. 

— Joan Eldridge 



A NEW ENGLAND PHILOSOPHY 

I have learned as a child in New 
England 
One certain, infallible thing; 
That, loath though she be to sur- 
render, 
Winter must tolerate spring. 

My soul from this lesson takes 

courage 

When sorrow prevails on my heart, 

For Nature has taught me; 'tis 

certain 

That bleakness is soon to depart. 

— Isabel Brown 



RESOLUTIONS 

The new year rolls around again; 

I take my diary and my pen 

And I with good intentions soar 

As I resolve to never more 

Put off the task that must be done. 

To hurt your feelings just for fun, 

Nor in a million little ways 

To lose the hours of precious days. 

And then the phone and his "hello," 

Nothing matters — / must go. 

My English theme I'll write at eight, 

My history will have to wait: 

Resolutions are a bore 

On the first new day of "44." 

— Beverly Armstrong 



Page 57 







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WINN STUDIOS 



Official Photographers to 

Plymouth High School 

Class of 1944 



******** 



132 BOYLSTON STREET 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



LIBerty 

1212 RICHARD G. MAHONEY 

1213 Manager 



Page 59 




Buy and keep on buying 
WAR SAVINGS BONDS 

THE PLYMOUTH NATIONAL BANK 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 




STEVENS... the Florist 



iFlmtwB fnr All ©rrasums 



Member of the 
Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 

Nine Court Street 



Page 60 



WHEN YOU ORDER 
"blue coal" 

YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE GETTING 

for 'blue coal' is the finest, free-burning 
anthracite mined . . . 

CANTONI COAL CO. 

Tel. 1233-R Hedge Road 



SRDOUI'S 



/ashion fenler ' 



Shows the newest in 
Misses' and Women's Wear. 



Clothes for All Occasions 

Sport Coats Suits 

Sport Slacks White Flannels 

Sweaters Shirts 

Ties Hosiery 

MORSE & SHERMAN 

WM. J. SHARKEY 
Court Street PLYMOUTH 



LINCOLN STREET 

SERVICE STATION 

PRIMO ZUCCHELLI 
Telephone 79 PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Page 61 



Dollars in the Bank 
Fight for Freedom . . . 



^VICTORY 
BUY 

UNITED 
STATE! 

WAR 

BONDS 




Use School Savings to Save for 

VICTORY 
Buy War Bonds Regularly 




PLYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 



PLYMOUTH FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANK 



Page 62 



CAPE 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

Insurance for Everything 
Insurable 

4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 
Telephone 87 -R 

Hope to Young Americans 

100% Defense Effort 

Will Win 

DO YOUR PART 
BEN. R. RESNICK CO. 

Tel. 698 
Cor. Summer and High Sts. 



SEARS FUEL CO. 

Coke — COAL— Charcoal 
Range and Fuel Oil 

Tel. 1214-W 
Lothrop St. Plymouth 

PLYMOUTH ROCK 
GROCERY 

FRESH FRUITS and 
VEGETABLES 

117 Sandwich St. Plymouth 
Telephone 1198 



BEST WISHES 



PLYMOUTH 

MACHINE AND BURNER 

CORPORATION 



Paae 63 



CAPPANNARI BROS. 



BUY BONDS FOR VICTORY 



Drink HOOD'S MILK for HEALTH 



Enna Jettick Shoes Little Student Shoes 

for Children 

EDDIE'S SHOE STORE 

E. HAND. Proprietor — 18 MAIN ST. 

THE FAMILY SHOE STORE 

A-Z Comfort Shoes A-Z Comfort Slippers 



If it's NEW 
you'll find it at 



GRANT'S 

The Value Spot in PLYMOUTH 



Page 64 



Compliments of 



» 





BEST WISHES 
from 

Arthur L. Ellis & Co., Inc. 

Manufacturers 

"Cape Cod" Curtains 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



Page 65 





MARIO'S GARAGE 


COLONIAL 


General 


DINER 


CAR REPAIRING 




120 Sandwich St. Plymouth 


KAY'S 
Cut - Rate 


TOWN BROOK 
Service Station 


Lowest Prices in Town 

PATENT MEDICINES 
COSMETICS 


Lubrication Vulcanizing 
REPAIRING 

24 -Hour Service 


67 Main St., Corner North 


Telephone 820-W 


Laundry Service 


We put new life in old shoes 


Convenient Economical 






PLYMOUTH 


Wih (Holotuj ICamtury 


SHOE HOSPITAL 


Tel. 272 Rowland St. 


63^2 Main St. Plymouth 


McLELLAN'S 


Best Wishes of 


QUALITY MERCHANDISE 


Forest Drug Store 


at Low Prices 


22 Court St. Plymouth 


PLYMOUTH 


Tel. 358 



Page 66 



SARACCA'S 
NEWS STAND 

36 Sandwich St. Plymouth 

CLOUGH'S 

THE COMPLETE 

FOOD MARKET 

Tel. 459 84 Summer St. 

LEONORE'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

46 Main St. Plymouth 

Telephone 1116-W 



If it's New and Smart you'll find it at 

Sylvia's Millinery Shop 

(Former Location of Children's Shop) 
18 Court St. Plymouth 



WILLIAM DiMARZIO 
INSURANCE 

1 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Phone Plymouth 440; Res. 1582 

GOODING'S 

Diamonds, Watches, Silverware 

Expert Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

Plymouth's Leading Jewelry Store 
for 140 years. 

4 Main St. Tel. 429 Plymouth 

DEXTER'S 
SHOE STORE 

Footwear for 
THE ENTIRE FAMILY 



Tel. 165-W 



16 Court St. 



DR. JOSEPH W. WILD 
DR. GEORGE S. WILD 

OPTOMETRISTS 



12 Main St. 



Plymouth 



Tel. 658 



Compliments of 

ALVES SHOE STORE 

Tel. 441 303 Court St. 

M. D. COSTA - Fruit Siore 

A. BONZAGNI, Prop. 

Fruit, Vegetables, Groceries 
Tel. 669 40 Court St. 

STEIN'S 
FURNITURE STORE 



Tel. 679 



291-293 Court St. 



CARROLL 
Cut Rate Perfumer 

Complete stock of Cosmetics 
and Patent Medicines 

47 Main St. 



Next Fire Station 



GAMBINFS 

Air-Conditioned 

LUNCHEONETTE 

Tel. 372 52 Main St. 

Plymouth Supply Co. 
Plumbing — Heating 

Paint and Hardware Supplies 
Tel. 1423 39 Court St. 

ZANELLO 
FURNITURE CO. 

QUALITY FURNITURE 
UPHOLSTERING BEDDING 

Norge — Gibson — Crosley Refrigerators 
Tel. 1485 84 Court St. 



WOOD'S FISH MARKET 

Tel. 261 Main St. Ext. 



Page 67 



Whitney Shirts 



Mallory Hats 



PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

WILLIAM CAVICCHI, Proprietor 

Telephone 341 18 Main Street 

LOW OVERHEAD — REASONABLE PRICES 

Inquire About our Special Offer on Suits 
for Graduation. 



Manhattan Shirts 



Character Clothes 



Right on the job 



and — on t"he job — right — When you drive 
in for gas, oil. or tire service here — you'll 
find us on the job — 



GASOLINE 



OILS 



LUBRICATION 



PARK AVENUE SERVICE 

Management — JOHN GALLERANI 
Formerly with Plymouth Motor Sales 

Court St. and Park Ave., PLYMOUTH 




JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 119 Years 

PAINT— HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES— HARDWARE 
PLUMBING and HEATING SUPPLIES 

1 Main Street PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 283 



Compliments oj 



EDES MANUFACTURING CO. 



Page 68 



Plymouth Cooperative Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 



Incorporated 1882 

A. PERRY RICHARDS 

President' 



WALDER J. ENGSTROM 
Secretary and Asst. Treas. 



Federalized 1937 



ROBERT J. TTJBBS 
Vice-President — Treasurer 



■VxisislI 




Ofrteti 




• t 



you will surely need a 

cash reserve as well as 

U.S. Savings Bonds, 

so add to your 

savings account 

substantially— of ten, 

BUY U. S. SAVINGS BONDS FROM CURRENT INCOME 

Plymouth Co-operative 
Federal Savings 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Fortu-fot'r A fa in St., 
Plymouth, Massachusetts. 



Page 69 



For the Graduation Gift, give a 

fine WATCH or RING 

We carry a complete line of Nationally-Advertised Watches 

BULOVA, BENRUS, ELGIN, GRUEN, HAMILTON, 
WALTHAM and LONGINE 

Friendship and Birthstone Rings Pen and Pencil Sets 

Overnight Cases Tie and Collar Sets Billfolds Lockets 

Crosses, Bracelets, Rosaries, Toilet Sets. 



-jewelry\ /company 



15 Main Street PLYMOUTH 

Tel. 65 



Best Wishes to the Class of '44 

BAILEY MOTOR SALES, INC. 

Telephone 1090 
114 Sandwich Street PLYMOUTH 

BUICK and PONTIAC Sales and Service 
G.M.C. TRUCK Sales and Service 

A reliable place to trade . . . One of the best-equipped 

service stations in the vicinity . . . Agents for 

Delco Batteries and United States Tires. 



Don't Forget: All of Our Repair Work is Guaranteed 



Page 70 



Donovan & Sullivan 

ENGRAVING COMPANY 

Official Engraver for Plymouth High School 
1938 - 1939 - 1940 - 1941 - 1942 - 1943 - 1944 



PHOTO*ENGRAVERS 



470 Atlantic Avenue Harbor Building 

Liberty 8711 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Represented by 

P. V. CARTER, Pembroke, Mass. 
Tel. Bryantville 326-13 



Page 71 



SOUTH CENTRE 
MARKET 



9 Market St. 



Tel. 400 



Tel. 1670 



SHERMAN'S 

PLYMOUTH 
NORTH PLYMOUTH 



Congratulation — Class of 1944 

WALTER S. PEARSON 

JEWELER 
62 Court Street Plymouth 

MITCHELL-THOMAS CO., 

INC. 

FURNITURE 
WALLPAPER - PAINTS 

66 Court Street Plymouth 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE 
SPECIALTIES 

1 Warren Ave. Plymouth 

Telephone 1298-W 

PLYMOUTH ROCK 
HARDWARE CO. 

62 Court St. Plymouth 

Telephone 950 



ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 
BEAUTY SHOP 

Room 10 Buttner Building 

PLYMOUTH 



CURRIER'S 

RESTAURANT 

and 

ICE CREAM SHOP 

Local Dealer for 

Whitman and Kemp Products 

63 Main St. Plymouth 



Page 72 



Compliments of 



L. KNIFE & SON 



The Turning Point of the Game 

Just when success seems impossible comes the 
home run and victory — That's baseball. 

In commerce you first start scoring by 

enlisting the services of a 

DEPENDABLE PRINTER 

THE ROGERS PRINT 

20 Middle Street Tel. 165-M Plymouth, Mass 



Congratulations to the Class of '44 

PURITAN TAILORING CO. 

TAILORING — PRESSING — REPAIRING 
56 Main Street PLYMOUTH 

E. CAVICCHI and SONS 

Fruit and Produce 

296 Court Street Tel. 1190 NO. PLYMOUTH 

Page 73 



ALPHONSO'S AUTO BODY 

ALPHONSO CHIARI, Proprietor 



BEAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT 



Saves Your Tires Drive Safely 



51 Samoset Street 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Telephone 300-W 



Page 74 



SCUDDER 

COAL and OIL CO. 

JOHN J. ALSHEIMER, Inc. 

FAMOUS 

READING ANTHRACITE 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



To the Graduating Class 
of Plymouth High School: 

We extend our sincere congratulations on the 
completion of your school course and express 
our best wishes for your future. 



At this time, we wish to thank you for your loyalty to us. We trust 
we may merit your continued patronage. 



BUTTNER'S 

OF PLYMOUTH 



Page 75 



BALBONI'S 
DRUG STORE 

'The Drug Store that Serves Plymouth' 

U. S. Postal Station No. 2 

Prescriptions Accurately Filled 

FREE DELIVERY 

JOSEPH BALBONI, Reg. Pharm. 
Tel. 1251-1057 317 Court St. 

For Night Service Call 1137-R 



LORING'S 

JEWELERS 



28 Main St. 



Plymouth 



CROWELL'S 
Furnishings 

For 
WOMEN and CHILDREN 



Good Quality at Just Prices 

KNIFED 

GROCERIES MEATS 

VEGETABLES 

FRUITS 

298 Court St. Plymouth 

Telephone 1286 



WALK-OVER 

SHOE STORE 

Agents for 

Walk-Over Shoes 

Bass Moccasins Kamp Tramps 

Arnold and Stetson Shoes 

Physical Culture Shoes 

Hill and Dale Shoes 



D. w. 
65 Main St., 



BESSE. Proprietor 

PLYMOUTH 



CONTENTE'S 
SHOE STORE 

Shoes for All the Family 

Better Shoes for Less Money 

Tel. 733-W 301 Court Street 

NORTH PLYMOUTH 

Stoddard & Talbot 

Iyisurance That Insures 
36 MAIN ST. PLYMOUTH 

Tel. 30 

Fire — Automobile — Plate Glass 

Burglary and All Other Types 

of Insurance. 



Silvio Leonardi 

PIONEER 
FOOD STORE 

298 Court St. Plymouth 

Telephone 53 



Page 76 



Best Wishes 




TAVERNELLI'S 


THE VIOLIN SHOP 


Barber Shop 


of 


Opposite Buick Garage 


ROGER S. KELLEN 


BANDER'S 




Plymouth's Most Popular 
SHOP FOR 


MARVELLI'S 


MISSES AND WOMEN 


NEWS STAND 


54 Main St Plymouth 


299 Court St. No. Plymouth 


Tel. 38 




DUNLAP 


C. PAUL 


Oil Service 


For Your 


GULF PETROLEUM 


SHOES and REPAIRING 




Honest Values 


SERVICE STATION 


Dependable Service 


Tel. 1278 23 Sandwich St. 


53 Court St. Plymouth 


SIBLEY'S 
SHOE STORE 


Compliments of 


Exclusive Agents in Plymouth for 




AIR- STEP Shoes for Women 


PEOPLE'S 


ROBLEE Shoes for Men 
BUSTER BROWN Shoes for 


MARKET 


Boys and Girls 




If It's New, It's at Sibley's 




11 Court Street 


16 Market St. Plymouth 



Page 77 



Pepsi - Cola 


GUY W. 


Hits the Spot 


COOPER 


Weather It's Cold or 


_ _ 


Weather It's Hot 

— o — 


GENERAL 


Drink 


MERCHANDISE 


PEPSI - COLA 


~~ °~~ 


— — 


Location 


PLYMOUTH 


JABEZ CORNER 


BOTTLING WORKS, INC. 


PLYMOUTH 


124 Sandwich Street 


Telephone 258 


Phone 1623-W 




"Plymouth's Modern Store for 




Men and Boys" 


Auto Supplies Bicycles 


We Feature 

Stetson Hats 
Florsheim Shoes 


WESTERN AUTO 
ASSOCIATE STORE 


Clippercraft Clothes 


6 Main Street 


Arrow Shirts 
Interwoven Hose 


PLYMOUTH. MASS. 


— o — 


(Home Owned) 


PURITAN 


C. F. FOWLER 


CLOTHING CO. 

"Home of Dependability" 


Columbia Records 


56 Main St. Plymouth 





Page 78 



Dr. William O. Dyer 


VERRE'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Hours: 8 a. m. to 8 p. m. 
52 Sandwich St. Plymouth 


BILLY WALSH'S 
MARKET 

The Home of 

Kefrigerative Vegetables 
Tel. 1259 54 Court St. 


LEWIS- 
DRY GOODS WALLPAPERS 
KYANIZE PAINTS 

13 Court St. Plymouth 


Dr. E. Harold Donovan 


Phone 406 

Hours : 9 :30 to 12 :00 — 1 :30 to 5 :00 
and by Appointment 

DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 

OPTOMETRIST 

Russell Bldg. Plymouth 


Dr. A. L. Douglas 


Compliments of 

GRAY, THE CLEANER 


Compliments of 

THE 

MEMORIAL PRESS 



Page 79 



VOLTA 
MUSIC SHOP 

RECORDS SUPPLIES 

SHEET MUSIC 

297 Court St. No. Plymouth 
Tel. 840-W 

MAROIS MARKET 

HOME DRESSED 
POULTRY 



Tel. 1250 



187 Court St. 



Relief for Acid Stomach 

BISMA-REX 

Four-Action Antacid Powder 

Neutralizes Acidity — Removes Gas — 
Soothes Stomach — Assists Digestion 

Big Bottle 50c 

Save with Safety at 

COOPER DRUG COMPANY 
BEMIS DRUG COMPANY 

"The 6 Busy Rexall Stores" 

Abington, No. Abington, Rockland 

"In Plymouth It's Cooper's 



PLYMOUTH&BROCKTON 
STREET RAILWAY CO. 

Ride Our Modern 
Air-Condiiioned Buses 



Sandwich St. 



Plymouth 



ELMER E. AVERY 
INSURANCE AENCY 

INC. 

Est. Since 1905 

16 Main St. Plymouth 

Tel. 166-W 

FIRE 

LIABILITY 
ACCIDENT 
AUTOMOBILE 



Insurance 
Surety Bonds 



BROCKTON 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Intensive Train'ng for 

Business and Government 
Service 

Send for 53rd Year Catalogue 

GEORGE E. BIGELOW 

226 Main St. Brockton 

Telephone 635 



FREDERIC A. BLISS 

Plumbing 
Heating 
Sheet Metal Work 
Opp. Old Colony Theatre 



BLISS HDWE. CO., INC. 

Plumbing Supplies Fertilizers 

DuPont Paints Garden Tools 

Locksmiths Builders' Hardware 



Telephone 825 



Plymouth 



Page 



Best Wishes to the Graduating Class 



Plymouth County Electric Company 

Main Street Extension PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 1300 



CECCARELLI 

CUSTOM TAILORS 

CLEANSERS FURRIERS 

We operate our own Cleansing Plant on Premises. 

We Call For and Deliver 

301 Court Street Tel. 941 NO. PLYMOUTH 

PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 
of All Kinds 

— Telephone 237 — 

Petroleum Sales and Service, Inc. 

Agents for 

Filtered Range and Fuel Oils While Flash Gasoline 
Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oils 

HEDGE ROAD PLYMOUTH 

Telephone Plymouth 1499 

Page 81 



JIM'S 




RESTAURANT 


E. CAVICCHI 


Incorporated 


& SONS 


FINE FOODS 




Our Specialty 


FRUIT 




PRODUCE 


7 Main Street Plymouth 






Tel. 1190 296 Court St. 


Telephone 1187-W 




To the Class of 1944 




VERY BEST WISHES 






Compliments of 


for a 






SAMOSET 


SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 


MARKET 


OLD COLONY and 




PLYMOUTH 




THEATRES 





Page 82 



Nook Farm Dairy 




MILK 

and 

CREA 



HEALTH BUILDER LOCAL MILK 

Taste the difference from a modern dairy 



TRY OUR FLAVORED DRINKS 



CHOCOLATE 



ORANGE 



COFFEE 



Nook Road PLYMOUTH 

Telephone: Plymouth 1261 



Page 83 



^ 0^ xYLutograpri 



2S 



Class of 1944 



— Class Colors — 

Ruby Red and White 



— Class Motto — 

On The Threshold